Simon is the Joint Chief Executive Officer at Perform Group

Under his tenure, Simon oversaw the strategic development of the leading digital sports content and media group from a product, geographical expansion perspective. Simon also founded Inform Group, a company that innovated performance analysis software with some of the most prestigious football clubs across Europe as customers.

The team at Perform is responsible for the strategic development of one of the world’s leading digital sports content and media groups from the product, geographical expansion, rights and commercial perspectives.

It has done this by overseeing several acquisitions, developing products to meet fans’ demand for on-demand high-intensity sports and driving its marketing strategy. Before joining Perform, Simon founded Inform Group, a company that innovated in performance analysis software with some of the most prestigious football clubs across Europe as customers.

Simon Denyer was previously a Washington Post bureau chief and served abroad in China, India, the US, and Afghanistan. He has also been awarded several journalism honours and has made many TV and radio appearances with notable hosts. He has written the following books: “Rogue Elephant”, “Foreign Correspondents”, and “The Drone Eats with Me. Former Washington Post Bureau Chief Simon Denyer left The Post in September 2021.

The article discusses the new campaign WildAid has started in Africa to reduce the consumption of Pangolin meat. The goal of this campaign is to protect pangolins from extinction. Simon Denyer, a Senior Consultant with WildAid, provides insight into the reasons behind the campaign and the goals they are trying to achieve. Pangolins are reclusive and nocturnal animals that roll up into a ball when threatened.

They can only be spotted in the wild rarely, and it is nearly impossible to raise them in captivity. However, they are heavily trafficked, with up to 200,000 being taken out of the wild every year on an international level. Recognizing the threat of extinction, CITES banned all international trade in 8 species in 2017. The biggest threat they face is their scales being used for traditional medicine. To learn more visit: here.